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Planner Profile #006

It’s been a while since the last PP- the bulk of my time has been spent in meetings, researching, and conducting site visits for my Urban Farmer’s Almanac project. So I’m excited to introduce you all to Isabel Qi, a coastal planner in Los Angeles who is making ~waves~

Name: Isabel Qi
Age: 25
Location: Los Angeles
Current employer/planning program: Coastal Planner at the California Coastal Commission

How did you decide to pursue urban planning professionally?
I’ve always been interested in sustainability issues and climate change, so I studied climate sciences in college. In my second year, I went to an exhibit at the Annenberg Space for Photography called Sink or Swim. At the exhibit, I saw photographs of the impact of sea level rise on coastal cities around the world, from Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans to monsoon flooding in Bangladesh. That made me feel the urgency of the issues brought by climate change, especially in coastal communities. I was inspired to learn about urban planning and design solutions to climate change. As I learned more about the field, I realized that I could use the tools of urban planning to work on intersections of sustainability with my other passions, such as transportation and public spaces.

Who inspires you to build better cities?
My sister has traveled to many cities in the U.S., Asia, and Europe. What’s really insightful is talking to her about how some neighborhoods and cities make her feel safer than others as a young Asian woman walking alone. I want to build safer urban spaces where everybody, including women, feel safe exploring the city and having fun without feeling like they’re limited to going out at certain times of the day or with certain people to avoid fearing for their safety.

How can we build safer, more inclusive urban spaces for communities big and small?
In the context of the current pandemic and racial justice movements, safety in urban spaces is a public health issue and a racial equity issue. We need to believe in scientific expertise and develop policies rooted in science to solve public health issues. As we have seen in the past six months, people don’t feel safe going to stores or gathering outside of their households when there’s a pandemic out of control. This makes urban spaces seem even more unsafe, as urban streets become deserted and we lose the eyes on the street. On the social equity side, instead of listening to the expertise of the few, we have to incorporate the perspectives and experiences of a broad and diverse group to ensure that we are addressing the needs of everyone, especially the marginalized communities who have historically been left out of decision-making processes. We have to help these groups feel like they truly belong to these spaces whether it’s through supporting their businesses, providing space for events of all cultures, or fostering diverse representation in various activities and organizations.

Where is your favorite urban space?
Little Tokyo in downtown LA. It’s walkable, connected to transit, and it’s just a great place to hang out! The non-profits and community organizations in Little Tokyo have created such a vibrant cultural scene there, and they’ve done such a great job of preserving the history of the neighborhood. I learn something new every time I visit!

How are you spending your summer quarantined in LA?
It’s been a very unusual summer both because of the pandemic and because I graduated from my Master’s program, which means lots of changes while being stuck at home! Lately, I’ve been settling into my new job from home. Outside of that, I’ve spent the new free time working out, discovering trails and outdoor spaces in the LA region, and trying new recipes. 

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